Women in History

Women have always played an important role in history. There were good women, bad women, destroyers of society and shapers. There were women who were unwillingly caught up in the events of history and those who made them happen. Some women were just downright interesting. This blog will post about them all. Requests are welcome.
We post twice a week. All asks are answered publicly unless otherwise indicated. Tag this blog with #historicwomenblog.
Lady Alice Kyteler of Kilkenny 1280
Women were a part of a lot of firsts. For instance, first person convicted of having sex with the devil (you thought Wonderland had the strangest Alice.)
 Lady Alice Kyteler was born and rich and powerful woman in the middle ages. Her first husband died mysteriously, and so did the next three. Of course few were ready to blame any of the common causes of death in the Middle Ages like bad hygien, poison, or living in the middle ages; so, the first thought was, of course, witchcraft. Lady Alice was powerful and therefore had powerful enemies who were willing to attest to her being a black-magic-practicing, baby-eating, husband-killing witch. 
She was brought to trial but in order to be convicted a witness was required. So, with the help of thumb screws, Alice’s servant Petronila de Meath   admitted to  taking messages between her mistress and the Devil himself and to watching the two make love in broad daylight (if you think you wouldn’t watch too, you’re lying.)
After her conviction Lady Alice fled to England leaving her servant to burn at the steak alone. This is where Alice’s paper trail ends. It is widely believed she lived to a comfortable old age. Petronila, however, was the only woman in Ireland to be burned for witchery. Petronila was later honored in Judy Chicago's artwork The Dinner Party. 

Lady Alice Kyteler of Kilkenny 1280

Women were a part of a lot of firsts. For instance, first person convicted of having sex with the devil (you thought Wonderland had the strangest Alice.)

 Lady Alice Kyteler was born and rich and powerful woman in the middle ages. Her first husband died mysteriously, and so did the next three. Of course few were ready to blame any of the common causes of death in the Middle Ages like bad hygien, poison, or living in the middle ages; so, the first thought was, of course, witchcraft. Lady Alice was powerful and therefore had powerful enemies who were willing to attest to her being a black-magic-practicing, baby-eating, husband-killing witch. 

She was brought to trial but in order to be convicted a witness was required. So, with the help of thumb screws, Alice’s servant Petronila de Meath   admitted to  taking messages between her mistress and the Devil himself and to watching the two make love in broad daylight (if you think you wouldn’t watch too, you’re lying.)

After her conviction Lady Alice fled to England leaving her servant to burn at the steak alone. This is where Alice’s paper trail ends. It is widely believed she lived to a comfortable old age. Petronila, however, was the only woman in Ireland to be burned for witchery. Petronila was later honored in Judy Chicago's artwork The Dinner Party

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