Women in History

Women have always played an important role in history. There were good women, bad women, destroyers of society and shapers. There were women who were unwillingly caught up in the events of history and those who made them happen. Some women were just downright interesting. This blog will post about them all. Requests are welcome.
We post twice a week. All asks are answered publicly unless otherwise indicated. Tag this blog with #historicwomenblog.
Nora Thompson Dean 1907–1984
Nora Thompson Dean was a Lenape Native American traditionalist. Her birth name was Wenjipahkeehlehkwe which roughly translates to “touching leaves woman.”She was a native speaker of the Unami language and dedicated herself to the preservation of the language and her culture.
Nora was educated in Oklahoma public schools and graduated high school as salutatorian. Since she was raised according to Native customs, she appreciated and taught them. She instructed Lenape religious ceremonies, social functions, dances, craftwork, herbal medicines, and language. Dean became an influential member of her community. She received awards for her crafts work and met with government representatives for Native preservation. She lectured at various universities and recorded Lenape language lessons. An Oklahoma governor declared Nora an ambassador of goodwill.  
 

Nora Thompson Dean 1907–1984

Nora Thompson Dean was a Lenape Native American traditionalist. Her birth name was Wenjipahkeehlehkwe which roughly translates to “touching leaves woman.”She was a native speaker of the Unami language and dedicated herself to the preservation of the language and her culture.

Nora was educated in Oklahoma public schools and graduated high school as salutatorian. Since she was raised according to Native customs, she appreciated and taught them. She instructed Lenape religious ceremonies, social functions, dances, craftwork, herbal medicines, and language. Dean became an influential member of her community. She received awards for her crafts work and met with government representatives for Native preservation. She lectured at various universities and recorded Lenape language lessons. An Oklahoma governor declared Nora an ambassador of goodwill.  

 

  1. lovelee193 reblogged this from historicwomen
  2. layzcreature0 reblogged this from historicwomen
  3. backwithpwrpwr reblogged this from the-yaadihla-girls
  4. the-yaadihla-girls reblogged this from historicwomen
  5. itsthesmallwonder reblogged this from historicwomen
  6. miscklaire reblogged this from beowulfstits-archive
  7. the--tree reblogged this from folk-punk
  8. youarethemoonn reblogged this from daddysolutions
  9. thealmostprince reblogged this from folk-punk
  10. casualbutthole reblogged this from folk-punk
  11. vikingpussy reblogged this from beowulfstits-archive
  12. garbage-roses reblogged this from daddysolutions
  13. daddysolutions reblogged this from folk-punk
  14. our-bluish-peacebone reblogged this from folk-punk
  15. black-metal-hermit reblogged this from millieisamouse
  16. cuddlybird reblogged this from folk-punk
  17. millieisamouse reblogged this from folk-punk
  18. maxkataetet reblogged this from marchcouldbedarker
  19. folk-punk reblogged this from qispichiq
  20. mybonesarescreaming reblogged this from wobblydash
  21. wobblydash reblogged this from qispichiq
  22. qispichiq reblogged this from beowulfstits-archive
  23. beowulfstits-archive reblogged this from marchcouldbedarker
  24. marchcouldbedarker reblogged this from historicwomen
  25. bronte-saurous reblogged this from riotingfeminist
  26. catbus-stop reblogged this from seranum