Women in History

Women have always played an important role in history. There were good women, bad women, destroyers of society and shapers. There were women who were unwillingly caught up in the events of history and those who made them happen. Some women were just downright interesting. This blog will post about them all. Requests are welcome.
We post twice a week. All asks are answered publicly unless otherwise indicated. Tag this blog with #historicwomenblog.
Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi 1842- 1906
Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi was an American physician and activist. She was born in England to American parents. Her father was reluctant when Mary showed an interest in studying medicine but he supported her pursuits. She began her studies at Pennsylvania but was dissatisfied with American education, she applied to the Ecole de Médecine in Paris. In 1871, she graduated with honors and a bronze medal for her thesis.
After completing her education, Mary returned to New York where she practiced medicine and taught. She was the first woman to be accepted to many medical societies including the New York Academy of Medicine. During her time as a physician, Mary published nine books and over 120 medical articles. One paper, “The Question for Rest Regarding Women and Menstruation,” argued that women were not disabled during their menstrual cycle. She used data from her own cycle which was published with the paper. It received  Harvard Medical School’s esteemed Boylston Medical Prize in 1876, despite surrounding controversy. 
Mary was also an active participant in the suffragist movement. She supported and encouraged her female students and did extensive work on female diseases and ailments.

Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi 1842- 1906

Mary Corinna Putnam Jacobi was an American physician and activist. She was born in England to American parents. Her father was reluctant when Mary showed an interest in studying medicine but he supported her pursuits. She began her studies at Pennsylvania but was dissatisfied with American education, she applied to the Ecole de Médecine in Paris. In 1871, she graduated with honors and a bronze medal for her thesis.

After completing her education, Mary returned to New York where she practiced medicine and taught. She was the first woman to be accepted to many medical societies including the New York Academy of Medicine. During her time as a physician, Mary published nine books and over 120 medical articles. One paper, “The Question for Rest Regarding Women and Menstruation,” argued that women were not disabled during their menstrual cycle. She used data from her own cycle which was published with the paper. It received  Harvard Medical School’s esteemed Boylston Medical Prize in 1876, despite surrounding controversy. 

Mary was also an active participant in the suffragist movement. She supported and encouraged her female students and did extensive work on female diseases and ailments.

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